‘No ICU beds!’ Sky News Jacquie Beltrao rages at anti-vaxxers as cancer ops get cancelled

BBC Breakfast: Dan Walker quizzes Javid on booster scheme

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Sky News presenter Jacquie Baltrao, 56, has hit out at those who refuse the Covid vaccine in a furious Twitter rant. Jacquie, who has been battling breast cancer, was angered after a check-up with her oncologist.

She directed her message to anti-vaxxers and criticised them for taking up beds in intensive care units when there are cancer patients that need them. 

She also claimed that cancer operations are being cancelled because there are no beds in ICU available. 

Writing to her 87,000 followers, the presenter said: “Had a lovely check-up and chat with my oncologist today. 

“For all you anti-vaxxers out there, at least 75 percent of patients with Covid in our local ICU have NOT been vaccinated. 

“Cancer ops ARE being cancelled because there are no ICU beds available should THOSE people need one.”  

She later hit back at a Twitter user, named BB, who questioned the accuracy of her statement and whether she would also call out obese people and smokers “for taking up beds”. 

Jacquie defiantly said: “No I am not. I am talking about Covid patients who are not vaccinated in ICU.” 

Another unnamed user said: “They contribute to the NHS just like everyone else. They have a right to care and to deny them that is morally wrong. The NHS should be fit for purpose.”

The former Olympian replied: “They are getting care, but they are also denying other people from getting critical care. 

“The point is they didn’t need to be in ICU. Their Covid did not need to be that serious.” 

Multiple UK hospitals have confirmed that the majority of patients in critical care are unvaccinated. 

On Friday, Dr David Windsor, a consultant in intensive care at Gloucester Royal Hospital, declared on Twitter that “100 percent of the patients in our Critical Care Covid unit” were unvaccinated, as reported by Gloucestershire Live.

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In addition, figures from Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust confirmed that there were 14 critical care patients with Covid, and 12 of them were unvaccinated, according to Nottinghamshire Live. 

Sir Andrew Pollard, head of the Oxford vaccination programme, went as far as to say that Covid is “no longer a disease of the vaccinated”. 

Writing in The Guardian, he said: “This ongoing horror, which is taking place across ICUs in Britain, is now largely restricted to unvaccinated people… To prevent serious illness, these people need doses of the vaccine as soon as possible.” 

He went on to say that most vaccinated individuals will only experience “mild infections” that are “little more than an unpleasant inconvenience”.

It comes after Boris Johnson’s announcement that the booster jab rollout will be amped up in a bid to combat the spread of the Omicron variant.  

The Prime Minister warned that to get all eligible adults boosted by the end of the year, “some other appointments will need to be postponed until the new year”. 

Today, Health Secretary Sajid Javid reassured the public that those seeking cancer treatment and other urgent appointments will be unaffected. 

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, he explained that primary care services and GPs will be focussing on the booster programme and urgent needs, with those seeking cancer treatment and urgent appointments getting seen within two weeks. 

The Health Secretary added hospitals would be able to postpone elective surgeries, like hip or knee operations, until the new year to “get a lot more booster jabs done”. 

Mr Javid said: “These decisions are not easy, but at any one time there is only limited capacity in the NHS.”

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