The Matrix Resurrections FIRST TRAILER is released

The Matrix Resurrections FIRST TRAILER is released! Keanu Reeves’ Neo returns to the alternate reality to battle a sinister new evil after reuniting with his old flame Trinity in tantalising glimpse at sci-fi sequel

  • The preview showed Keanu Reeves’ long-awaited return to the alternate reality of years of dire existence as the heroic Neo to battle a sinister new evil
  •  The film, which comes 18 years after the release of the last Matrix film, also sees the return of Carrie-Anne Moss as the heroine Trinity
  • Little is known about the plot of the long-awaited sequel, which comes 18 years after the conclusion of The Matrix Trilogy in 2003
  • The Matrix: Resurrections will be released on December 22, 2021 

The Matrix Resurrections released its much-anticipated first trailer on Thursday, offering fans a tantalising glimpse at the sci-fi sequel after years of being shrouded in secrecy.

The preview showed Keanu Reeves’ long-awaited return to the alternate reality of years of dire existence as the heroic Neo to battle a sinister new evil.

The film, which comes 18 years after the release of the last Matrix film, also sees the return of Carrie-Anne Moss as the heroine Trinity, along with a slew of newcomers including Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Priyanka ChoprA and Jonathan Groff.

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He’s back! The Matrix Resurrections released its much-anticipated first trailer on Thursday, offering fans a tantalising glimpse at the sci-fi sequel after years of being shrouded in secrecy

The preview begins with a downbeaten Thomas in the midst of a therapy session, with his psychologist (Neil Patrick Harris) questioning some of the hacker’s unusual dreams, while viewers see flashbacks to the famous Matrix that Neo faced in the original trilogy.

While Thomas is reassured that he’s not ‘crazy,’ it’s clear his mind has struggled to escape the Matrix, as he’s seen taking a myriad of blue pills, which keep him in a state of contented ignorance.

And despite battling the agents side-by-side, it appears that ‘Neo’ is unable to remember his former flame Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss), as the pair are seen meeting in an office, completely unaware of their crime-fighting history. 

Thomas can be seen meeting with Trinity in the real world, with the pair hinting at whether they’ve met before, unaware of their romantic history battling agents in The Matrix.

Reunited! The preview showed Keanu Reeves’ long-awaited return to the alternate reality of years of dire existence after crossing paths with his old flame Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) in the real world

What’s going on? The preview begins with a downbeaten Thomas Anderson, Neo’s real name before he entered The Matrix, in the midst of a therapy session, with his psychologist (Neil Patrick Harris) questioning some of the hacker’s unusual dreams

Familiar face: And despite battling the agents side-by-side, it appears that ‘Neo’ is unable to remember his former flame Trinity, as the pair are seen meeting in an office, completely unaware of their crime-fighting history

Barren: While Thomas is reassured that he’s not ‘crazy,’ it’s clear his mind has struggled to escape the Matrix, as he’s seen taking a myriad of blue pills, which keep him in a state of contented ignorance

It soon becomes clear that Neo is struggling to resist the temptation to return to the technical fantasy, and can be seen meeting with a mysterious bookseller (Priyanka Chopra), appropriately brandishing a copy of Alice In Wonderland – a book regularly referenced in the film – and a mysterious white rabbit tattoo.

A man dressed in a long coat, shirt and pince-nez glasses is an apparent nod to Laurence’s Fishburne’s Morpheus. The actor is not set to appear in the new film.

Neo is also seen walking through a mirror, an apparent nod to the scene in the first film when he touches a mirror and its silver surface becomes liquid and travels up his arm.

What’s going on? It soon becomes clear that Neo is struggling to resist the temptation to return to the technical fantasy, and can be seen meeting with a bookseller (Priyanka Chopra), appropriately brandishing a copy of Alice In Wonderland

Do it! Eventually Neo succumbs and takes the red pill from a mysterious figure, which many fans have claimed could be a younger incarnation of Laurence Fishburne’s Morpheus

At odds: Neo is seen telling the same man (played by Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) in a dojo that ‘you don’t know me’ before he thrusts at his chest and sends a shockwave which flattens the building

He’s joined by a mysterious new female heroine (Jessica Henwick) with the pair sharing an intimate moment after he is transported back to The Matrix. 

Whilst the original film was famed for its fight scenes, the new trailer shows that the fourth instalment isn’t light on action either.

Neo is seen telling a combat opponent (played by Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) in a dojo that ‘you don’t know me’ before he thrusts at his chest and sends a shockwave which flattens the building.

Who is that? He’s joined by a mysterious new female heroine (Jessica Henwick) with the pair sharing an intimate moment after he is transported back to The Matrix

Tense: Whilst the original film was famed for its fight scenes, the new trailer shows that the fourth instalment isn’t light on action either

There they are! The famous ‘Agents’ – who were led by Hugo Weaving’s character Agent Smith in the first three film

The famous ‘Agents’ – who were led by Hugo Weaving’s character Agent Smith in the first three films – also make a return, as do the womb-like pods in which humans are kept in a comatose state by the machines which control them. 

Giving a further hint that Neo’s god-like powers still remain, he is seen stopping bullets and even diverting a missile into a helicopter before the trailer closes out with a man telling Neo: ‘After all these years, to be going back to where it all started. Back to the Matrix.’

Die-hard fans of the trilogy will remember that humanity is unknowingly trapped inside a simulated reality which machines have used to distract humans while using their bodies as an energy source. 

Ahead of the trailer’s release, fans were treated to a cryptic teaser featuring the famous blue or red pills, along with the caption: ‘The choice is yours.’

Piercing static serves as the backdrop, while tiny strings of Matrix code are seen falling down inside the pills before the entire scene melts.

The trailer invited fans to continue their saga on WhatIsTheMatrix.com, an interactive choose-your-own-adventure style site.

Presented with the same choice there, red takes you down a rabbit hole where you’re told: ‘This is the moment for you to show us what’s real.’

Scenes from the film then flash across the screen, showing the thin barrier between reality and the artificial world known as The Matrix.

‘This could be this is the first day of the rest of your life, but if you want it, you gotta fight for it,’ the narration wraps while showing star Keanu Reeves ready to fight.

Ready for action: The Matrix Resurrections got their buzz started by teasing the first official trailer for the film online Tuesday

Reality: The red pill takes you down a rabbit hole where you’re told: ‘This is the moment for you to show us what’s real’

Picking the blue pill offered another path, asking viewers: ‘Do you remember how you got here?’

‘You’ve lost your capacity to discern reality from fiction,’ the narrator says before several surreal scenes flash by.

‘What’s real is here and now… Anything else is just your mind playing tricks on you.’

‘It becomes a problem when fantasies endanger us,’ they warn as someone is seen pouring out a bottle of blue pills.

Then, ending on a sinister note, they show someone touching the computer port at the back of their head and ask: ‘We don’t want anyone to get hurt, do we?’ 

Though HBO offered few details about the movie’s plot, they weren’t lacking enthusiasm in their official description.

The network’s description reads: ‘Plug into The Matrix Resurrections the long-awaited fourth film in the groundbreaking franchise that blew minds, and redefined a genre.

‘From visionary filmmaker Lana Wachowski, the new film reunites original stars Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss as Neo and Trinity, the iconic roles they made famous.’

The original Matrix feature was released in 1999 and was met with much critical praise upon its debut. The feature was followed up by two further films, which were both released in 2003.

The first film sees Neo given a choice between the red pill, which will reveal the truth about the real world, or blue to return him to his mundane former life.

After swallowing the red pill, his old world fades away and he awakens naked among millions of other humans attached to an elaborate electrical system that wires them to the alternate world.

The Wachowskis, who directed all of the entries in the series, initially had no plans to continue the franchise after the third picture’s debut. However, rumors about a potential fourth film began to circulate in the early 2010s.

When cinema took the red pill: How The Matrix’s ‘bullet-time’ special effects, martial arts and heavy dose of philosophy changed film and culture forever – as trailer for FOURTH movie is released TODAY

By Harry Howard, History Correspondant for MailOnline 

  • The film made stars Keanu Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss, Laurence Fishburne and Hugo Weaving hot property
  • It is set in a nightmare future around the year 2199, where super-intelligent machines rule over humans
  • Men and women are kept in a comatose state and fed a simulation – The Matrix – which they believe to be real
  • The ‘wire-fu’ fight scenes and ‘bullet-time’ special effects heavily influenced future blockbusters
  • Woven into the script were references to Alice in Wonderland, The Bible, Greek mythology and Buddhism  

With its revolutionary action sequences and philosophy-laden plot about a dystopian world where machines are in charge, the cinematic and cultural impact of The Matrix still endures to this day.

Released to critical and popular acclaim in 1999, the film made stars Keanu Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss, Laurence Fishburne and Hugo Weaving hot property in Hollywood.

The film is set in a nightmare future around the year 2199, where super-intelligent machines keep humans in a comatose state in womb-like pods. They are fed a simulation – The Matrix – which they believe to be real.

A group led by Fishburne’s character Morpheus and Moss’s Trinity work to turn computer programmer Thomas Anderson into Neo – who they believe to be ‘The One’ – by offering him a choice: take the ‘red pill’ and join the resistance or opt for the ‘blue pill’ and remain in The Matrix.

Their enemies – the AI gatekeepers of The Matrix – are led by Hugo Weaving’s disturbing Agent Smith.

The film, created and directed by the Wachowski twins – won four Oscars, thanks in part to the incredible ‘wire-fu’ fight scenes and ‘bullet-time’ special effects which heavily influenced future blockbusters including Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and the first X-Men.

And woven into the script and scenes were influences from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, The Bible, Greek mythology, and eastern religions, whilst Reeves was ordered to read weighty philosophical textbooks before filming began.

Whilst two follow-up films were made – The Matrix Revolutions and Reloaded – it was the original which has endured in the popular memory.

Now, after a lengthy wait of nearly 20 years, a fourth film – The Matrix Resurrections – has been made, with Reeves and Moss reprising their roles.

Yesterday, fans were treated to a teaser ahead of the release of the film’s first trailer tomorrow. It depicted both a red and blue pill beneath the words, ‘The choice is yours’.

With its revolutionary action sequences and philosophy-laden plot about a dystopian world where machines are in charge, the cinematic and cultural impact of The Matrix still endures to this day. Released to critical and popular acclaim in 1999, the film made stars Keanu Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss, Laurence Fishburne and Hugo Weaving hot property in Hollywood

Whilst Reeves, Fishburne and Weaving were already established actors before The Matrix was released, Moss said that she had ‘no career’ beforehand.

Speaking to the New York Daily News, she said: ‘The Matrix gave me so many opportunities. Everything I’ve done since then has been because of that experience. It gave me so much.’

Fishburne, who is not in the upcoming fourth film, said in a previous interview that the original was the first to ‘deliver on what comic books always promised.’

‘They took the best elements of all the things they liked and used them in such a way that it’s not disrespectful. They’re taking all of the old stuff and trying to present it in a modern context,’ he added.

However, The Matrix could have been very different if production company Warner Brothers’ original approaches to other actors had succeeded.

Hollywood superstar Will Smith turned down the role of Neo in favour of making the Western comedy Wild Wild West, which was hated by critics.


A group led by Fishburne’s character Morpheus and Moss’s Trinity (right) work to turn computer programmer Thomas Anderson into Neo – who they believe to be ‘The One’ – by offering him a choice: take the ‘red pill’ and join the resistance or opt for the ‘blue pill’ and remain in The Matrix

The film, created and directed by the Wachowski twins won four Oscars, thanks in part to the incredible ‘wire-fu’ fight scenes and ‘bullet-time’ special effects which heavily influenced future blockbusters including Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and the first X-Men. Above: The famous scene where Neo dodges bullets fired by an agent 

The famous pill scene (above) has been subsumed into popular culture and was recently referred to by billionaire Elon Musk

The film is set in a nightmare future around the year 2199, where super-intelligent machines keep humans in a comatose state in womb-like pods (above). They are fed a simulation – The Matrix – which they believe to be real

Their enemies – the AI gatekeepers of The Matrix – are led by Hugo Weaving’s disturbing Agent Smith (above)

To create the equally legendary fight scenes, the Wachowskis enlisted the help of respected martial arts choreographer and director Yuen Woo-ping. Above: Trinity attacking a policeman in an early scene from the film

The ‘Wire Fu’ nickname – a play on Kung Fu – stemmed from the fact that the real actors – rather than stunt doubles – were often suspended from wires in fight scenes. Above: The famous combat scene between Neo and Agent Smith, where they both fired guns at each others heads whilst dodging bullets in the process

In one of the most famous scenes in The Matrix, Neo – whose ‘powers’ are steadily growing – is seen in slow-motion flinging himself backwards and downwards to avoid bullets fired from the gun of an agent. The sequence was filmed using hundreds of cameras to create a stunning slow-motion three-dimensional effect

Woo-ping went on to work on films including Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (pictured), which again made us of his expert martial arts choreography

Woo-ping also choreographed the martial arts sequences in Quentin Tarantino’s 2003 film Kill Bill (above)

How The Matrix’s ‘bullet-time’ special effects were done 

In one of the most famous scenes in The Matrix, Neo – whose ‘powers’ are steadily growing – is seen in slow-motion flinging himself backwards and downwards to avoid bullets fired from the gun of an agent.   

The sequence was filmed using hundreds of cameras to create a stunning slow-motion three-dimensional effect.   

Taking advantage of the advance in computer technology, the Wachowskis first mapped out the shots with digital models.

Each camera was mounted on a specialised rig and was set up using a motion-controlled laser-pointing system to find the best shooting angle. 

Each frame from the different cameras then had to be merged with the next through a technique called ‘interpolation’. This allowed for the motion and different elements in the scene – such as Trinity’s legs – to move smoothly. 

 The cameras were also placed at varying distances between each other, allowing for the final image to appear to accelerate and decelerate at certain points.

As for the background, the scene had to be shot using a green screen to avoid the individual cameras being visible to the rest.   

Reeves was also held in place by wires, allowing him to move so acrobatically. The bullets, which were of course computer-generated, had to also be made to look convincing.   

Now, technology has advanced to the point where similar scenes in Hollywood blockbusters can be made to look even more realistic whilst using fewer cameras.   

Nicolas Cage and Leonardo DiCaprio were also approached to play the central role, whilst Val Kilmer was considered both for the Neo and Morpheus parts.

Remarkably, Janet Jackson only rejected the role of Trinity because of scheduling conflicts prevented her from taking it on.

A major part of The Matrix’s appeal was due to the fact that its makers were able to take advantage of huge advances in computer technology to create stunning visual effects.

In one of the most famous scenes, Neo – whose ‘powers’ are steadily growing – is seen in slow-motion flinging himself backwards and downwards to avoid bullets fired from the gun of an agent.

The ‘bullet time’ sequence – which required the use of hundreds of cameras to create the stunning three-dimensional effect that the viewer is treated to – went on to become an over-used cliché when similar versions appeared in films ranging from Superman to Kung Fu Panda.

To create the equally legendary fight scenes, including where Neo first shocks Morpheus with his ability when the pair square up in a dojo, the Wachowskis enlisted the help of respected martial arts choreographer and director Yuen Woo-ping.

Reeves worked with him for months, enabling him to feature in the intricate physical duels rather than rely on stunt doubles.

Similar scenes in Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill, which was released in 2003, where choreographed by Woo-Ping.

And the film’s distinctive black leather and PVC costumes, as well as the characters’ dark sunglasses, went on to be copied in the likes of X-Men and fantasy horror Underworld.

Producer Joel Silver, whose previous work includes action classics Lethal Weapon and Die Hard, said that while he had been involved in several films which had ‘helped redefine the genre’, they all ‘pale compared to The Matrix. The Matrix changed the way we see things.’

As for its philosophical and literary influences, there are repeated references to Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, including in one of the film’s earliest scenes, where Neo is told by Trinity to ‘follow the white rabbit’ before his first meeting with Morpheus.

Philosophical work Simulacra and Simulation, by Jean Baudrillard, is one of the books which Reeves was told to read and absorb before he had even looked at the script.

The book also features at the beginning of the film, where Neo uses it in hollowed-out form to hide cash and computer discs.

Later on, Morpheus refers to the real world outside The Matrix as the ‘desert of the real’ – another reference to Baudrillard’s work.

When Neo is on his path to becoming The One, Neo meets a boy who closely resembles a Buddhist monk.

Holding a spoon which he bends using only his mind, he then tells a confused Neo: ‘Do not try and bend the spoon, that’s impossible. Instead, only try to realize the truth… there is no spoon.

Another famous scene (above) in the film saw Neo and Trinity engage in a huge gun fight with scores of police, leaving the all of the officers floored

The bullet-time scene was filmed using hundreds of cameras to create a stunning slow-motion three-dimensional effect

After the release of The Matrix, Andy and Larry Wachowski came out as transgender women and changed their names to Lana and Lilly (right) 

The pair, pictured during filming, filled The Matrix’s script and scenes with philosophical and literary references


The Matrix also modernised the film franchise by going cross-platform too. In addition to existing on-screen, there were book, graphic novels, games (above) and animated features

Action figures were also produced, showing The Matrix’s main characters in a variety of costumes and poses. Above: Neo 

This Morpheus action figure showed the character in a costume from the original film. Other versions showed him in The Matrix Reloaded and Revolutions


Along with the two sequels – The Matrix Reloaded and Revolutions – which were released back-to-back in 2003, spin-off video games including Enter The Matrix and the Path of Neo ensured that the film’s cult following remained alive

‘Then you’ll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself.’ Neo is then able to very briefly carry out the same trick.

The film’s green graphic compositions of unintelligible code have also been subsumed into popular culture, as have numerous pithy sentences uttered by Morpheus.

What fans said about The Matrix the first time they saw it

Writing on Q&A website Quora, fans of The Matrix told how it ‘floored’ them when they first saw it. 

‘It was a game changer’ 

One said: ‘When I saw the Matrix for the first time. I was floored – the story, the martial arts, the super cool special effects with the new ‘Bullet Speed’ 360 degree 3D virtual camera technology was a game changer for action Sci-Fi movie making. I swear I must have watched this movie over 50 times. I now incorporate the phrase ‘i am having a Matrix moment’ when I speak about stuff I think is really cool.’  

‘It took my breath away’ 

Another wrote: ‘The opening scene with Trinity just takes our breath away. Good build and good tension, but then all of a sudden she explodes with non-human agility and the entire audience just starts screaming. I watch the scene now and I can’t really recapture the feeling. It was just so unexpected.’ 

‘It opened my mind to other schools of thought’ 

A third said: When Morpheus was asking Neo ‘what is real? How do you define real?’ It opened my mind more to other schools of thought. After an almost 15 year exploration of other religious world views and increase of scientific knowledge I finally shed all my religious thinking and became an atheist. The first time I saw the film it challenged me intellectually while keeping my interest with the action sequences that started me on my own path.’ 

In one early scene, he tells Neo, ‘I can only show you the door. You’re the one that has to walk through it,’ while in another he says prophetically: ‘There’s a difference between knowing the path and walking the path.’

Thanks in part to this philosophical depth and its bonanza of game-changing action sequences, The Matrix – which was released a month and a half before Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, went on to gross $465million at the box office.

It also won Oscars in the editing, sound and visual effects categories.

Along with the two sequels which were released back-to-back in 2003, spin-off video games including Enter The Matrix and the Path of Neo ensured that the film’s cult following remained alive.

Whilst the Wachowskis had had no plans to continue the franchise beyond the initial three films, rumours about a fourth film began to circulate nearly a decade ago.

The teaser released yesterday for the new film – which is written and directed by Lana – invites fans to go to WhatIsTheMatrix.com, where they could choose to ‘take’ the red or blue pill.

Those who opt for red are taken down a rabbit hole and told: ‘This is the moment for you to show us what’s real’.

Scenes from the new film then flash across the screen before the narrator says: ‘This could be the first day of the rest of your life, but if you want it, you gotta fight for it.’

Those who pick the blue pill are told: ‘Do you remember how you got here?’

‘You’ve lost your capacity to discern reality from fiction,’ the narrator says before several surreal scenes flash by.

‘What’s real is here and now… Anything else is just your mind playing tricks on you.’ ‘It becomes a problem when fantasies endanger us,’ they warn as someone is seen pouring out a bottle of blue pills.

Then, ending on a sinister note, it shows someone touching the familiar metal port at the back of their head before the narrator asks: ‘We don’t want anyone to get hurt, do we?’

Few details have been given about the film’s plot, but it is expected to be released on December 22.

The teaser released yesterday for the new film – which is written and directed by Lana – shows Reeves in his return as Neo

The teaser invites fans to go to WhatIsTheMatrix.com, where they can choose to ‘take’ the red or blue pill

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