What Princess Charlotte will be called at school and her adorable nickname as she starts Year 1

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Princess Charlotte and her older brother Prince George are set to return to school this week after months of homeschooling by Kate Middleton and Prince William during lockdown.

With the five year old joining George to return to Thomas’s Battersea for a new term, Charlotte will enter Year One at the £19,287-a-year school.

With George and Charlotte being treated equally to other pupils at the school, this means Kate and William’s daughter could be going by a different title.

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Members of the royal family don’t use surnames, but when they need one they often use the title of their royal house or their parents’ title.

This means for George and Charlotte and their younger brother Prince Louis, the children use their father’s title whenever they need a surname.


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So instead of using her full title, Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, Charlotte could be called Charlotte Cambridge while in school.

Kate and William have also axed titles while at home, and have adopted nicknames for their children.

According to reports, the Duchess of Cambridge refers to her daughter as “Lottie”.

Last year a shopper who bumped into the Cambridges while they were doing a bit of late minute Christmas shopping also added that Kate Middleton said to Princess Charlotte: “Get up, poppet.”

Prince William has also been heard in a video appearing to call Charlotte “Mignonette”, which means “small, sweet, dainty or delicate” in French.

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