Russell Watson says double brain tumour horror has made him look younger

Russell Watson successfully battled against two brain tumours, but the impact of the health condition has left a surprising permanent mark.

The 54-year-old opera singer revealed his skin is youthful as a result of the brain tumours, due to the hormonal imbalances he suffered at the time.

Russell was diagnosed with two separate brain tumours in 2006 and 2007, he told The Sun, only to thankfully return to full health.

Describing the impact the health scare had on his skin, he told the publication: "I am lucky, I've got my mum's skin – she looks about 50. I've been lucky with that.

"And as well, because of what I had, the hormonal imbalances that I have had have affected.

"The type of illness I had is known for making you look like you have a younger looking face because I wasn't producing certain hormones and not producing certain other ones. So I am actually 3373 years old."

Recalling his fans' reaction to his youthful glow, he added: "I have been asked about having Botox before but I've never had it.

"In the middle of last year, someone Tweeted me and said: "'Oh my God, look at Russell Watson's face – he can't move it with all the Botox he's had.'

"I thought, ‘I haven't had any! But thanks mate!'"

When the first signs of the tumour began to show, doctors assumed the English tenor, whose new album 20 is released later this week, was simply suffering from stress.

However, a 2006 MRI scan revealed he had a tumour the size of two golf balls in his brain, which had left him struggling to see.

Russell was admitted to hospital for an emergency operation in London, with medics removing the tumour through his nose.

The following year, doctors discovered he had a regrowth of a tumour in his brain, and he underwent emergency surgery in Manchester.

Proving a fighter, he released his sixth studio album – titled Outside In – later that year.

Speaking about the impact of his health battle, Russell explained it made him realise the importance of his family, putting his two daughters first.

He told The Times in 2007: "It [his first tumour] changed my priorities.

"Made me appreciate the importance of relationships, of friends and family and, most of all, my two daughters."

The beloved crooner added: "My fear for them if I died, – that was the worst part. I adore them."

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