Queen’s conversation with Michael Fagan in The Crown never happened in real life

The Crown Season four is live on Netflix to the glee of fans across the world.

While the historical drama gives an amazing glimpse into the real life events of the Royal Family, it will come as no shock that the show has taken a few liberties.

On July 9, 1982, one of the most bizarre incidents of Queen Elizabeth II’s reign took place.

An unemployed decorator called Michael Fagan broke into Buckingham Palace and walked into the Queen’s bedroom.

The event is depicted in the episode called Fagan, where we see it from his perspective.

In The Crown, Fagan breaks in because he wants the Queen to know how people like him were left behind by the conservative government.

In the episode they speak about the dangerous impact of Thatcherism on working class Britain.

He said of the then-Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher: “She’s destroying the country.

“The right to work, the right to be ill, the right to be old, the right to be frail, to be human-gone.”

Fagan and the Queen parted in fairly cordial fashion, with Her Majesty saying: “I shall bear in mind what you said.”

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But according to Fagan himself, this part is entirely fictionalised, and not what happened between them.

The bones of the story is true – Fagan did break into the Queen’s bedroom, and reportedly spent 10 minutes there until she was able to get help.

But according to Fagan there was very little conversation between the two.

In an interview with BBC in 1993, Fagan said that he went to the Queen’s window and drew the curtains.

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He sat at the end of his bed, but Her Majesty told him to leave.

He explained; “A lot has been said about what went on in that room. This is the truth: She just said get out.”

Fagan was asked about the “lengthy” conversation in another interview with the Independent in 2012, he said: “Nah! She went past me and ran out of the room; her little bare feet running across the floor.

According to Scotland Yard’s incident report at the time, Her Majesty attracted the attention of a maid, and “together they ushered Fagan into a nearby pantry on the pretext of supplying him with a cigarette”.

Speaking to The Telegraph ahead of the launch, The Crown writer Peter Morgan said they “used a lot of artistic licence” to tell Fagan’s story.

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